For the Community

Speaking Engagements

We are also available to speak by invitation to various groups and organizations in Smith County. Examples of where we often share information about Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, and the Alliance’s services include churches, civic organizations, social groups, professional associations, community senior adult groups, elementary through high school classes, and college classes.

Topics are tailored to the group and may include:

  • Normal vs. Not Normal Aging
  • Meeting and recognizing unmet needs, challenging behaviors and other dementia care strategies.
  • Positive Approach to Care
  • Best Dementia Care – Seeing it from the Other Side of the Mirror
  • The Basics about Dementia & Alzheimer’s Symptoms
  • Taking Charge of your Brain Health
  • Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease
  • When to Ask for Help
  • Dementia vs. Alzheimer’s Disease
  • How to Support a Caregiver
  • How to Be a Friend to Someone with Alzheimer’s and Their Family
  • Programs & Services of the Alzheimer’s Alliance of Smith CountyTime allotted for a speaker from the Alliance can vary from 10 minutes to two hours. Contact our office to schedule one of our staff to speak at your event. A minimum of two-week advance notice is appreciated.
    Download request form HERE. 
    Please fill it out and email to stephanie@alzalliance.org

Health Fairs 

We are happy to attend community health fairs, please call our office to request. 

Dementia Friendly Tyler

A dementia friendly community is one that cares about its neighbors. It’s a place where people with dementia will live as independently as possible. Where they will be valued and respected. Where they will engage in activities that we all take for granted and will be supported as these activities become more difficult. Where the changes in the person will be noticed, understood, and accepted.

A dementia friendly community is one that has looked at its shops, restaurants, markets, and streets through the eyes of a person with dementia, and then does everything it can to make it a place where they and their families can thrive. When memory changes begin, many become more isolated, which frequently hastens the cognitive decline. A community that understands dementia will be one that supports and cares for its neighbors and those individuals who are struggling to deal with loss of memories, loss of the ability to do routine activities, loss of jobs, loss of independence, and loss of self.

(adapted from the Alzheimer’s and Dementia Alliance of Wisconsin)